Sh2-187 and LDN1317

The area in Cassiopeia contains a lot of well-known and lesser-known emission nebulae and dark dust lanes. One of the objects, not far from the star Ruchbah is Sh2-187 and the surrounding dust of LDN1317. I think it is a neat little gem that is often overlooked and so I’m happy that I was able to capture it during the past weeks. This little star nursery lies about 4700 ly away from us.

Sh2-187 and LDN1317

Telescope: 16″ f3.75 Dream Scope
Camera: FLI ML16803
Mount: ASA DDM85
Exposure: 15 hours (110x300s L + 3x24x300s RGB)
Date: July & September 2017
Location: Southern Alps, France

 

 

CTB1, a very faint supernova remnant in Cassiopeia

My latest addition is this picture of an object which has not been photographed that often, probably because it has a very low surface brightness. CTB1 is a nearby supernova remnant in the constellation of Cassiopeia with an apparent diameter of about a half a degree. Upon early discovery, CTB1 was thought to be a planetary nebula, so Abell included it in his catalog of planetary nebulae as Abell 85. Further research showed that CTB1 is in fact a supernova remnant. Distance and age estimates are 10,000 light years, and 7,500 – 11,000 years, respectively. It spans nearly 100 light years.
As the object is very faint, it requires a lot of exposure time. Main portion was spent on Ha and O3, with a smaller amount of RGB for the stars.

CTB1 (Abell85)

Telescope: 16″ f3.75 Dream Scope
Camera: FLI ML16803
Mount: ASA DDM85
Exposure: 35.5 hours (156x300s Ha + 161x300s O3 + 3x30x300s RGB)
Date: August 2017
Location: Southern Alps, France

The Total Solar Eclipse, August 21st 2017 – Idaho, USA

This is an overview of the pictures I took during the total solar eclipse in St Anthony, Idaho, USA, on August 21st 2017. The conditions were close to excellent. No clouds, dry air and fairly good seeing.
We picked a spot not too far from the center line from where the duration of the total eclipse was 2’00”. Far away from the cheering crowds we could experience the eclipse in the middle of the Idaho plains. It was a truly unforgettable experience.
The top half of the picture shows some different stages of the moon covering the sun. The three middle pictures show the moment of (close to) totality.
The bottom half of the picture is an HDR composition with shutter speeds ranging from 1/4000s to 2s, showing the red solar flames, the solar corona and some ‘earth shine’ (sunlight reflected by the earth and shining on the dark side of the new moon)


Sh2-155 – the Cave Nebula

Sh2-155 (also designated Sharpless 155 or S155) is a diffuse nebula in the constellation Cepheus, within a larger nebula complex containing emission, reflection, and dark nebulosity. It is widely known as the Cave Nebula. Sh2-155 is an ionized H II region with ongoing star formation activity, at an estimated distance of 2400 light-years from Earth. Sh2-155 lies at the edge of the Cepheus B cloud (part of the Cepheus molecular cloud), and is ionized by young stars from the Cep OB3 association. It has been suggested that radiation from the hot O-type star HD 217086 is compressing the region, triggering the formation of a new generation of stars. A study of the region’s young stellar objects by the Chandra X-ray Observatory and Spitzer Space Telescope shows a progression of stellar ages in front of the cloud, supporting the hypothesis of triggered star-formation!

Sh2-155, the Cave Nebula

Telescope: 16″ f3.75 Dream Scope
Camera: FLI ML16803
Mount: ASA DDM85
Exposure: 185x5min LHaRGB (Ha blended with RGB)
Date: June – July 2017
Location: Southern Alps, France

 

VdB141 or the Ghost nebula

The Ghost Nebula (designated Sh2-136 and VdB 141) is a reflection nebula located in the constellation Cepheus. It lies near the cluster NGC 7023. Looking at the image, especially the cut-out, the nebula’s name is easily understood. The Ghost nebula is referred to as a globule and over 2 light-years across. There are several stars embedded, whose emissions make the nebula shine in brownish colour.

VdB141, Ghost nebula

Telescope: 16″ f3.75 Dream Scope
Camera: FLI ML16803
Mount: ASA DDM85
Exposure: 146x5min LRGB
Date: June – July 2017
Location: Southern Alps, France

 

Cut-out of VdB141

 

 

Nebulas galore

The first picture is LDN1235, a dark molecular cloud in the constellation of Cepheus. Also visible are the bright blue reflection nebulae VdB149&150.
The second picture is a bi-color narrowband image in Ha and O3 of the hydrogen rich area in Cygnus. Top right is NGC6888 or Crescent nebula at a distance of 5000ly. Middle left is the very faint PN G75.5+1.7 or Soap Bubble nebula, discovered only very recently by an amateur astronomer in 2008 (not me  )

LDN1235

Telescope: 16″ f3.75 Dream Scope
Camera: FLI ML16803
Mount: ASA DDM85
Exposure: 148x5min LRGB
Date: June – July 2017
Location: Southern Alps, France

NGC6888 and PN G75.5+1.7

Telescope: 16″ f3.75 Dream Scope
Camera: FLI ML16803
Mount: ASA DDM85
Exposure: 126x5min Ha(R) + O3(B) + synth G
Date: June – July 2017
Location: Southern Alps, France

 

 

IC1396 in Hubble Palette

Having an observatory in a remote area with no light pollution doesn’t mean it’s dark all the time. The light of the moon can spoil the view. So that’s why sometimes I switch to narrow band imaging , using filters that block a large part of the spectrum. With S2, Ha and O3 filters I created a false color image according the so-called ‘Hubble Palette’. The object on this picture is IC1396 in the constellation of Cepheus at 2400 light years away.

The Elephant’s Trunk in IC1396

Telescope: 16″ f3.75 Dream Scope
Camera: FLI ML16803
Mount: ASA DDM85
Exposure: 192x5min SII(R) + Ha(G) + OIII(B)
Date: June 2017
Location: Southern Alps, France

 

Arp188 or the Tadpole Galaxy

The Tadpole Galaxy is a disrupted barred spiral galaxy located 420 million light-years from Earth toward the northern constellation Draco. Its most dramatic feature is a massive trail of stars about 280,000 light-years long; the size of the galaxy has been attributed to a Galaxy merger with a smaller galaxy which is believed to have occurred about 100 million years ago. Because of its great distance from Earth, the apparent size is only 3.6 x 0.8 arcmins.
Click on the picture and see if you can spot the Tadpole galaxy in the wide-field view.

Arp188 or the Tadpole Galaxy

Telescope: 16″ f3.75 Dream Scope
Camera: FLI ML16803
Mount: ASA DDM85
Exposure: 65x5min L + 29x5min each for RGB
Date: May 2017
Location: Southern Alps, France

Data acquisition: Karel Teuwen and Bart Delsaert
Processing: Bart Delsaert

vdB 152

van den Berg (vdB) 152 is an elongated molecular cloud 1,400 light years distant in the constellation of Cepheus. It is sufficiently dense in localized areas to block all light from stars from reaching us. In other areas, some stars shine through. Its reddish color is largely due to light scattering off dust particles within the cloud. This preferentially scatters light of shorter wavelengths and lets redder light through. The tip of the cloud near the center of the image is reflecting blue light from a nearly embedded star.

vdB 152

Telescope: 16″ f3.75 Dream Scope
Camera: FLI ML16803
Mount: ASA DDM85
Exposure: 56x5min L + 18x5min each for RGB
Date: April – May 2017
Location: Southern Alps, France